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King’s College London | London
Faculty

Dr. Kirsty Bannister

Working in:

  • Animal models
  • Invasive recording systems
  • Optogenetic systems

I investigate the functionality of brain and spinal cord sensory circuits in healthy/chronic pain rodents and humans. My labs translational experiments focus on addressing the problem of failure when it comes to the discovery of novel analgesics. To address invalid targets, our pre-clinical work focuses on defining circuitry in health/pinpointing dysfunction in disease. To address limitations of currently used methods to assess pain, our clinical work focuses on translational paradigms and appropriate stratification of patients into cohorts.

University of Cambridge | Cambridge
Faculty

Dr. Flavia Mancini

Working in:

  • Computational and dynamical brain models
  • Digital Health
  • Neurofeedback
  • Data science and biomarkers

Flavia Mancini is an MRC Career Development Award fellow and head of a multidisciplinary research group, called the Nox Lab, at the Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge. The Nox Lab includes a mix of computational neuroscientists, information and biomedical engineers, united by a shared passion for the development of open-source computational methods to understand brain function and improve human health. Their work is motivated by neuroscience questions relating to how neural activity generates perception and behaviour, mostly in humans. They use a combination of neuroimaging, physiological, behavioural and computational methods for the processing of neural signals and behavioural/clinical data.

The Nox Lab’s current work has a primary application to chronic pain. They take an innovative information engineering approach to understanding the neural processing and regulation of pain. Nox Lab’s research is split into a basic research line, aiming to understand the computational and neural mechanisms of pain inference, learning and control, and a translational research line in which they translate this knowledge into digital and neurotechnology tools for precision medicine, pain prevention and treatment.

University of Plymouth | Plymouth
Faculty

Dr. Elsa Fouragnan

Working in:

  • Animal models
  • Computational and dynamical brain models
  • Non-invasive brain stimulation
  • Neurofeedback
  • Data science and biomarkers
  • Other

My research focuses on the neurobiology of decision-making and learning. I use multimodal neuroimaging and neurostimulation methods to uncover the roles of multiple areas in the brain, predominantly the prefrontal cortex. Recently, I have shown that transcranial ultrasound neuromodulation can safely change neural activity in precise parts of the brain, both in non-human primates and humans. I am now working towards bringing this technology forward and apply it to mental health challenges.

Anglia Ruskin University | Cambridge
Faculty

Dr. Jane Aspell

Working in:

  • Non-invasive brain stimulation
  • Virtual reality

My lab seeks to investigate the multisensory bodily basis for self-consciousness. We do this by creating ‘out of body’ illusions using virtual reality setups, and by measuring the integration of multisensory exteroceptive and interoceptive bodily signals in neurotypical participants, participants with autism, and participants living with chronic pain and depersonalisation.